CLMR

A collection of quotes about love, life, and creation. Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and various tumblr writers make common appearances.

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The goal is to understand your true self before launching an action plan. Deep realizations about yourself don’t come all in one sitting. Be your own ethnographer for a month. One of the people that I admire most in the world is Jane Goodall. Imagine Jane sitting in the forest, looking at those chimpanzees with compassion and curiosity. Take on her kind tone and attitude while observing yourself. Be gentle and curious but never judgmental. This is very hard for us to do because we’re always talking shit to ourselves.

Take a notebook and notice every time you get excited about something. It doesn’t have to be a big moment or work related… Just write it down each time—no judgments. What happens over the course of the month is you start seeing some patterns. It gives you a peek into your authenticity and things that energize you. When your whole body lights up with joy, it’s really trying hard to tell you something—it’s saying, “hey, this is important, please pay attention.”

[…]

You need to spend time understanding who you truly are before you forge a path. If you’re making plans based on other people’s perception of you or the perception of yourself that you want to project based on some external force, you’ll always end up in the wrong place.


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Advice to those just starting out on a creative path from Sharon Ann Lee, one of the most brilliant people I know – a fine addition to our ongoing archive of life-advice.

Complement with how to find your purpose and do what you love

(via explore-blog)

Apr 18 / 943+ / ©

I taste the good and bad in you and want them both.
--Anita Ofokansi, Literary Sexts (via bellumnia)
Apr 17 / 144496+ / ©

Real fearlessness is the product of tenderness. It comes from letting the world tickle your heart, your raw and beautiful heart. You are willing to open up, without resistance or shyness, and face the world. You are willing to share your heart with others.
--Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche from Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior
Mar 30 / 1104+ / ©

Nothing holds me. Let me say that I myself have torn myself to shreds.
--Franz Kafka, from The Blue Octavo Notebooks (1917-1919)
Mar 26 / 9248+ / ©

Consider it: every person you have ever met, every person will suffer the loss of his friends and family. All are going to lose everything they love in this world. Why would one want to be anything but kind to them in the meantime?
--Sam Harris, The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason (via yourmatchmyfire)
Mar 26 / 77+

We took such care of tomorrow but died on the way there.
--Warsan Shire (via psych-facts)
Mar 26 / 19882+ / ©

The first language humans had was gestures. There was nothing primitive about this language that flowed from people’s hands, nothing we say now that could not be said in the endless array of movements possible with the fine bones of the fingers and wrists. The gestures were complex and subtle, involving a delicacy of motion that has since been lost completely.

During the Age of Silence, people communicated more, not less. Basic survival demanded that the hands were almost never still, and so it was only during sleep (and sometimes not even then) that people were not saying something or other. No distinction was made between the gestures of language and the gestures of life. The labor of building a house, say, or preparing a meal was no less an expression than making the sign for I love you or I feel serious. When a hand was used to shield one’s face when frightened by a loud noise something was being said, and when fingers were used to pick up what someone else had dropped something was being said; and even when the hands were at rest, that, too, was saying something. Naturally, there were misunderstandings. There were times when a finger might have been lifted to scratch a nose, and if casual eye contact was made with one’s lover just then, the lover might accidentally take it to be the gesture, not at all dissimilar, for Now I realize I was wrong to love you. These mistakes were heartbreaking. And yet, because people knew how easily they could happen, because they didn’t go round with the illusion that they understood perfectly the things other people said, they were used to interrupting each other to ask if they’d understood correctly. Sometimes these misunderstandings were even desirable, since they gave people a reason to say, Forgive me, I was only scratching my nose. Of course I know I’ve always been right to love you. Because of the frequency of these mistakes, over time the gesture for asking forgiveness evolved into the simplest form. Just to open your palm was to say: Forgive me.

If at large gatherings or parties, or around people with whom you feel distant, your hands sometimes hang awkwardly at the ends of your arms – if you find yourself at a loss for what to do with them, overcome with sadness that comes when you recognize the foreignness of your own body – it’s because your hands remember a time when the division between mind and body, brain and heart, what’s inside and what’s outside, was so much less. It’s not that we’ve forgotten the language of gestures entirely. The habit of moving our hands while we speak is left over from it. Clapping, pointing, giving the thumbs-up, for example, is a way to remember how it feels to say nothing together. And at night, when it’s too dark to see, we find it necessary to gesture on each other’s bodies to make ourselves understood.


--Nicole Krauss, The History of Love  (via commovente)w (via eulphen)
Mar 25 / 2429+ / ©

Anonymous asked:
Am I the only one who thinks there's a difference between poems and poetry?

I wouldn’t say you’re the only one (there’s hardly ever an only one of anything), but I personally define poetry and poems as something simple that pulls at you and happens to have a broken line structure.


Some women are
lost in the fire.
Some women are
built from it.
--Michelle K., Some. (via michellekpoems)
Feb 24 / 113450+ / ©

May I write words more naked than flesh,
stronger than bone, more resilient than
sinew, sensitive than nerve.
--Sappho (via elucipher)
Feb 17 / 2166+ / ©